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Always, Never, Usually, Often, Most, and More

Learn how to properly use these dangerous words.

By
Mignon Fogarty,
February 16, 2017
Episode #556

Page 3 of 3

A Quick and Dirty Tip: Name Your Sources

Finally, make your attributions clear. I don't consider some say or critics have asserted to be meaningful. Name your sources. Earlier when I said, "Someone asked me about the difference between most and many," it would have been better to name the person: A reader named John T. asked about the difference between most and many.

Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing

I'm Mignon Fogarty, author of the New York Times best-seller, Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing. Here's what a recent buyer, Michelle Cimino, had to say in a review: "I've used your book many times to make sure I don't make a fool out of myself--especially since grammar is not my strongest suit! I highly recommend this for anyone who needs a little help here and there...or for people like me who need a LOT of help." Thanks, Michelle!

You can pick up a copy of Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing at most major bookstores. More than half of the bookstores I've checked carry it, so I believe that was a legitimate use of "most."

This article was originally published March 25, 2010 and was updated February 16, 2017.

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