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Why You Should Take a Personal Money Day

Do you take a personal Money Day? Learn why you should and how you can use a Money Day to take control of your financial life.

By
Laura Adams, MBA,
April 4, 2011
Episode #215

Page 1 of 3

Sometimes the biggest barrier between you and your money is time. You’ve probably heard about some new ways you could improve your financial situation if you just had a few extra hours in your day. Maybe your sister tells you about a credit union that has no fees for checking. A co-worker convinces you not only to fund your 401(k), but to also start a Roth IRA. You learn about a new personal finance blog or a financial podcast that you'd like to dig into. But real life gets in the way.

Why You Should Take a Personal Money Day

There is a solution, though, and it only takes a small sacrifice. If you have grand financial plans that you never seem to have time for, consider taking a personal Money Day. Choose a normal weekday, when banks and businesses are open and stay home from work or don’t do any regular work if you usually work from home. Don't worry that you're using a vacation day for "nothing." This vacation day will repay you many times over, not just now, but for years to come.

How to Prepare for a Personal Money Day

Before your Money Day, get prepared. Make a plan and remove any mental or physical barriers that might prevent you from getting things done. Make a list of the tasks you hope to accomplish and gather all of the information you need, such as phone numbers and account statements. Eliminate distractions. Commit to using the entire day to take control of your financial life. For this one day, nothing else matters.

What sort of tasks should you do on your Money Day? Here are six suggestions:

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