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Kid-Free Vacation

Believe it or not, taking a vacation without the kids can be done. It’s a good time to recharge, spend some time with your spouse, and come home refreshed.

By
Cherylyn Feierabend,
October 6, 2007
Episode #035

Page 1 of 3

Hey there! You’re listening to the Mighty Mommy with some quick and dirty tips for practical parenting. Today’s Topic: Going it Alone
Tips for Vacationing Without the Kids
Believe it or not, taking a vacation without the kids can be done. It’s a good time to recharge, spend some time with your spouse, and come home refreshed. I never really felt like I’d be able to leave my kids for longer than the usual dinner-and-a-movie routine takes. In the last two months, however, I was actually able to get away twice with my husband. My first trip didn’t go as well as I would have liked, but it helped me plan ahead for the second trip. I’ve definitely learned a few things! So before you pack your bags, I have some suggestions for you to consider.
My first trip this year was to the Star Trek Convention in Las Vegas. We left Friday afternoon and returned late Sunday night. My mom had generously volunteered to watch the kids. By the time I’d called to check in with the kids on Saturday morning, my mom was exhausted. My three-year-old was definitely not on her best behavior. I tried talking with my daughter on the phone. I reminded her to “listen to Grandma” and “be a good girl.” Unfortunately, my requests fell on deaf little ears. I knew I would have to change our babysitting plans for our following trip to the Portable and New Media Expo in September. We were going to be gone for another three days.
My first plan of action was to call in reinforcements. I know that is not always a possibility for everyone, but if you have family or friends that you trust to watch your children and they are willing, I say call in the favors! If you can set up a schedule where each caregiver only has your child part-time, you might find it easier to get some help. Since the main issue in my situation was my daughter’s behavior, I chose to split her time up between three different caregivers. She stayed with my mom the first day, my brother’s family the second day and my mother-in-law on the third day. Splitting my daughter’s time between three different people not only gave my mom a break, but it also distracted my daughter from the fact that I wasn’t available.

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