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Bounty Hunter Laws

Do you know what to do if a dogged bounty hunter breaks down your door?

By
Adam Freedman
4-minute read

Today’s topic: Bounty Hunters!

But first, your daily dose of legalese: This podcast does not create an attorney-client relationship with any listener. In other words, although I am a lawyer, I’m not your lawyer. In fact, we barely know each other. If you need personalized legal advice, contact an attorney in your community.

Bounty Hunter Laws

A listener asks whether it’s true that “a bounty hunter can enter his prey's residence without a warrant,” and, “if a bounty hunter breaks down a door can the person inside legally use deadly force to defend himself?”

Great question!

What is a Bounty Hunter?

In case you haven’t been following the exploits of Dog the Bounty Hunter, let me explain that a “bounty hunter” is a person who captures bail jumpers for a reward, that is, for a “bounty.” A bounty hunter may also be known as a bail bondsman, bail agent, bail officer, fugitive recovery agent, fugitive recovery officer, or bail fugitive recovery specialist. Of course, local and state police departments and the FBI also hunt for fugitives, but the financial incentive of a bounty often leads to faster apprehension of bail jumpers. In other words, bounty really is the quicker picker upper. 

Of course, local and state police departments and the FBI also hunt for fugitives, but the financial incentive of a bounty often leads to faster apprehension of bail jumpers. In other words, bounty really is the quicker picker upper.

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About the Author

Adam Freedman

Adam Freedman is a lawyer and a regular contributor to Point of Law and Ricochet. Freedman’s legal commentary has been featured in The New York Times, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, and on Public Radio. He holds degrees from Yale, Oxford, and the University of Chicago. He is the author of The Naked Constitution (2012).