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Why You Need More Magnesium in Your Diet

Two out of three people don't get enough magnesium in their diet. Here's why this matters and how to fix it. 

By
Monica Reinagel, MS, LD/N, CNS,
Episode #374

You don't hear a lot about magnesium these days. Unlike vitamin D or omega-3s, which seem to be in the health headlines every week or so, magnesium seems to be a nutrient that we take largely for granted. Yet 61% of Americans don't get the recommended amount of magnesium each day. And adults over the age of 50 are even more likely to fall short. Not surprisingly, magnesium was flagged as a "nutrient of concern" by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

Although you're probably not suffering from any acute symptoms due to magnesium deficiency, you could be missing out on important benefits. A diet rich in magnesium will help you build and maintain stronger bones, keep your blood pressure down, and reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes.  

Magnesium is also not hard to come by. It's found in a wide variety of whole foods. In fact, if you're eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, it would be  hard not to meet the requirement. Low magnesium intake is really a marker for diets that are high in processed foods. 

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