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How to Hold a Grudge with Nora McInerny

Has a therapist ever told you to write a letter and never send it, or to just write out your feelings? Did you ignore them? In this interview with Nora McInerny, we find out the power of journaling and how it can help in even the most dire of situations. 

By
Dr. Monica Johnson
1-minute read
Episode #377

Hey everyone, you’re in for a special treat! You’re going to hear the conversation I had with Nora McInerny, host of the podcast Terrible, Thanks For Asking, on the concept of a grudge book—her form of journaling.

I am a big fan of journaling and it’s commonly recommended by therapists. Additionally, it’s something that most people have access to and is relatively inexpensive as a self-care practice.

In this interview, you’ll hear how Nora used the grudge book through one of the most difficult times of her life—the loss of a loved one.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app.

Some important takeaways:

  • Journaling is an effective way to process painful emotions.
  • Having a grudge for a period of time can be valid.
  • Journaling can help a problem to feel more manageable.
  • Journaling can help instill patience and a sense of discovery.
  • There are many forms of journaling or writing that are beneficial to your mental health: gratitude, bullet, a regular notebook, letter writing, a grudge book, etc.
All content here is for informational purposes only. This content does not replace the professional judgment of your own mental health provider. Please consult a licensed mental health professional for all individual questions and issues.

About the Author

Dr. Monica Johnson

Dr. Monica Johnson is a clinical psychologist and owner of Kind Mind Psychology, a private practice in NYC that specializes in evidenced based approaches to treating a wide range of mental health issues (e.g. depression, anxiety, trauma, and personality disorders). Additionally, she has a focus on working with marginalized groups of people including BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and alternative lifestyles to manage minority stress. She is also dedicated to contributing to her field professionally through speaking, training, supervision, and writing. She routinely speaks at conferences, provides training and workshops at organizations, supervises mental health trainees, and co-authored a book for professionals on addressing race-based stress in therapy.

Dr. Johnson earned her bachelor's degree from the University of South Carolina, completed her Psy.D. at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology, and completed her postdoctoral training year at Cherokee Health Systems in Knoxville, TN. She currently lives in Manhattan where she indulges in horror movies, sarcasm, and intentional introversion. You can find her on Instagram and online at kindmindpsych.com

Got a question that you'd like Dr. Johnson to answer on Savvy Psychologist? You can send her an email at psychologist@quickanddirtytips.com or leave a voicemail for the Savvy Psychologist listener line by calling (929) 256-2191‬.