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Results For: grammar

  Today, we’ll talk about irregular verbs. Why do we say we saw a movie instead of we seed a movie, and did you know that the past tense of the verb “help” used to be “holp” instead of “helped”? Regular Verbs Versus Irregular Verbs Most of the time...
- September 12, 2019
It is I, Grammar Girl, here to help you understand when to use the words “I” and “me.” A listener named Jodie wanted to know which is correct: "It is I" or "It is me." She says that when she answers the phone and the person asks, "Is Jodie there?...
- September 10, 2019
Aspirin Fungicide If your garden is infected with fungus, mix one piece of ground-up aspirin with a quart of water and use it to water your plants once a week. (Be careful, as too much aspirin can damage your plants.) Chamomile Fungicide To kill fungus on your plants, brew up an extra-strong cup...
- September 10, 2019
Have you ever wondered about the term “wheelhouse?” Our listener named Heidi did. She asked, “Have you guys noticed the term ‘wheelhouse’ being tossed around a lot lately? It seems to be the business meeting/pop culture buzzword du jour. I’m wondering if you...
- September 10, 2019
Does it make you cringe whenever someone says they tasked someone with something? Do you scratch your head when someone wants to know what the ask is or says that you need a solve for a problem? Do you run the other way when someone says they want to dialogue with you? If so, you’re probably...
- September 09, 2019
  I’ve had several questions recently about conditionals. Some of them are from listeners asking about kinds of conditionals called the “first, second, and third conditionals.” Meanwhile, a listener named Lorelai has a different question. She understands English conditionals...
- September 05, 2019
Today we’re going to talk about a totally awesome topic: semantic bleaching. This has nothing to do with words in our language turning white. Instead, it has to do with how the meaning of words can fade over time — just like a colorful shirt fades after it’s been washed too many...
- September 02, 2019
Today, we’re going to tackle two of the scariest things you may ever be asked to do: writing and delivering a speech. To help your next presentation go well, check out these quick and dirty tips for writing scripts and speeches. Tip #1: Keep it Quick and Dirty Keep it short. Abraham Lincoln...
- August 29, 2019
Today we're going to talk about the written equivalent of voice tone and body language: the nonverbal parts of written word. Here in the 21st century, we’re all on display, all the time. When you start a new job, within moments your bosses and co-workers have Googled you, Binged you...
- August 27, 2019
  I had my first comedy hit with the phrase “itty-bitty kidneys.” Of course, the audience was my eight-month-old son, so it wasn’t much of a hit, but every time I uttered those magic words he’d laugh until he couldn’t breathe. Similar phrases (including “...
- August 26, 2019
One of our listeners named Gregg wrote in recently with a question. He wanted to know if there’s a term for words that change their definition when their syllable emphasis changes.  He mentioned the word “invalid” as an example. According to Merriam-Webster, the word means...
- August 23, 2019
In honor of launching our new podcast, Relationship Doctor, and his episode about three ways technology can ruin your relationships, I have the run-down on a few words related to online dating. Swipe Right First is “swipe right.” This phrase originally came from the dating app called...
- August 20, 2019
  What Is Point of View What is "point of view"? For fans of the book “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” let’s think of point of view (POV) as the Babel fish of literature. It is a universal translator turning your brainwaves into the...
- August 19, 2019
  Have you ever tried to read something in a foreign language? Maybe some words looked familiar, but it was hard to determine what the sentence meant. Maybe the structure didn’t seem to follow the rules you’re used to. Now, imagine having the same problems reading your native...
- August 17, 2019
An eponym is a word that’s based on a person’s name. For example, Adolphe Sax was a Belgian instrument maker who brought a new instrument to a Victorian event in 1851 called The Great Exhibition. His main job was making flutes and clarinets, and his invention, which looks like...
- August 16, 2019

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