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Results For: grammar

St. Patrick’s Day is coming up March 17. With that in mind, today we’re going to talk about three phrases you’re likely to hear on that holiday. Before we dive in, here’s a refresher on St. Patrick. His life was pretty eventful. He was born in Great Britain in the 5th...
- March 07, 2019
Starting a lengthy writing assignment can feel like standing at the base of a mountain—before you take the first step, you’re gazing at what seems like an impossible task. Similar to a difficult hike, long-form writing can be rewarding. When approaching a long writing assignment, it...
- March 07, 2019
1. How to Use Quotation Marks On the mysteries of combining quotation marks with other punctuation marks. 2. 'Lay' Versus 'Lie' The present tense is relatively easy: "lay" requires an object (you lay a book on the table), and "lie" doesn't (you lie on the...
- March 04, 2019
I made an embarrassing mistake the other day. I wrote "I can't hardly believe..." when I should have written "I can hardly believe..." "Can't hardly" is an example of a double negative—something many writing experts say you should avoid—...
- February 28, 2019
  Click the player to hear the interview. This is a summary of the topics we discussed. Language Influences Memory We talked about two new studies suggesting that language can influence people, at least in small ways, and we talk about Neal's previous article that includes an anecdote...
- February 25, 2019
Click on the player to hear the whole interview. Benjamin Dreyer's book, "Dreyer's English," became a surprise bestseller and is already on its fifth printing just two weeks after the publication date. Dreyer, vice president, executive managing editor and copy chief of...
- February 21, 2019
One of our recent advertisers, The Real Real, made me think of a cool language thing that’s been on my radar for a few years but that I haven’t covered yet. It’s the doubling of words to show that something is, well, real. I think the first time I heard it was in this ad for the...
- February 19, 2019
Incorporating a new recruit into your zombie army can be tricky. Of course, you’ll help create the all-important zombie-recruit/misunderstood-villain dynamic by using a process conversation, as described in episode 513, How to Strengthen Relationships with Process Conversations. ...
- February 18, 2019
  I’ve been interviewing authors for the podcast lately, and one question we always ask is what words give them trouble, and I think more than half of the authors—successful, and in many cases New York Times bestselling authors—more than half of the authors say they can...
- February 14, 2019
  The midwestern United States was hit in January by some of the coldest weather in decades. In Buffalo, North Dakota, and Chicago, Illinois, windchill temperatures fell to minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit. In Ponsford, Minnesota, it reached minus 66. Schools closed; the postal service suspended...
- February 14, 2019
Take a Pre-Slumber Soak Before you hit the sack, prepare a hot bath and soak for 10-15 minutes. Also try alternating hot and cold: Soak your legs in the bath for a few minutes, then remove them and place an ice pack on them. Go back to the bath, and continue the process a few times. See Also:...
- February 13, 2019
Click on the player to hear the entire interview. Paula Brackston writes a successful book series that started with the New York Times bestseller "The Witch's Daughter," and now she's embarking on another series with her new book, "The Little Shop of Found Things." The...
- February 11, 2019
You're about to hit send on your latest pitch, story or newsletter when you're stopped in your tracks. "Did I correctly use numbers in the headline?" "Did I misplace that comma?" Don't let uncertainty over AP style make you question the quality of your work....
- February 08, 2019
Today's topic is “irregardless.” Hi, Grammar Girl. I'm an English teacher in Boston, Massachusetts, and I am freaking out. One of my students tells me that “irregardless” is now a word, and apparently it's been added to some dictionaries. Can you...
- February 07, 2019
  In 2017, I asked people on Twitter what it's called when a family has words only they understand, and some people said it’s called family slang or kitchen table lingo, and a couple of people said it’s called a “familect” or “familiolect.”  If a...
- February 04, 2019

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