ôô

"Between" Versus "Among"

“Between” Versus “Among”

By
Mignon Fogarty,
February 4, 2010
Episode #207

Page 1 of 3

Today we're going to talk about the difference between the words “between” and “among.”

Between Versus Among

You may have noticed that I said we were going to talk about the difference between the words “between” and “among.” I used the word “between” because I was talking about a choice that involves two distinct words.
Many people believe “between” should be used for choices involving two items and “among” for choices that involve more than two items. That can get you to the right answer some of the time, but it's not that simple (1, 2, 3, 4).

Here's the deal: you can use the word “between” when you are talking about distinct, individual items even if there are more than two of them. For example, you could say, "She chose between Harvard, Brown, and Yale" because the colleges are individual items.

Relationships

The Chicago Manual of Style describes these as one-to-one relationships. Sometimes they are between two items, groups, or people, as in these sentences:

Choose between Squiggly and Aardvark.

Let's keep this between you and me.

Other times they can be between more than two items, groups, or people as in these sentences:

The negotiations between the cheerleaders, the dance squad, and the flag team were going well despite the confetti incident.

The differences between English, Chinese, and Arabic are significant.

On the other hand, you use “among” when you are talking about things that aren't distinct items or individuals; for example, if you were talking about colleges collectively you could say, "She chose among the Ivy League schools."

If you are talking about a group of people, you also use “among”:

Fear spread among the hostages.

The scandal caused a division among the fans.

Squiggly and Aardvark are among the residents featured in the newsletter.

Pages

Related Tips

You May Also Like...

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest