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3 Tips on How to Eat Less Without Feeling Hungry

Need to lose a few pounds? These simple tips will make it easy to cut back without feeling deprived.

By
Monica Reinagel, MS, LD/N, CNS
February 8, 2011
Episode #126

Page 1 of 3

In recent weeks, I’ve written several articles about reducing your risk for common diseases. I’ve offered tips for raising your HDL cholesterol, improving your insulin sensitivity, reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes, and slowing the aging process. And as you may have noticed, one piece of advice keeps coming up over and over again: In order to be and stay healthy, you have to get yourself to a healthy weight. 

For more up-to-date information on healthy eating, check out my new guidebook, Nutrition Diva's Secrets for a Healthy Diet. Read a free chapter here.

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How to Eat Less Without Feeling Hungry

Of course I realize that this is a lot easier said than done. After all, if losing weight were easy, two thirds of the population wouldn’t be overweight.   In order to lose weight, you have to eat less and when you eat less you usually feel hungry, which most of us find unpleasant. And that’s where it falls apart for a lot of people. So today, I have some tips for you on how to eat fewer calories without feeling hungry.

This isn’t about a diet that you go on—and then fall off of. It’s about getting your body’s appetite-regulating mechanisms working for you instead of against you.  These strategies can help you lose weight if you need to but are also helpful as a maintenance strategy.

3 Tips to Trick Your Stomach Into Thinking It’s Full

Your stomach is a little like a water balloon. When it’s empty, it’s relatively small and slack. When you fill it up, it stretches and gets tauter. There are special nerve cells in the lining of your stomach called proprioceptors that detect this stretching and send a message to your brain that you’re full.  Now, the only thing that these proprioceptors can sense is stretching. They can’t tell the difference between a quart of skim milk and a quart of half and half. All they know is that something is filling your stomach. You can use this to your advantage.

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