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Good Neighbor Relations

It is especially important to treat your neighbors with consideration and respect. If you have ever had especially good (or especially bad) neighbors, you will know what a strong effect that can have on your daily life.

By
Michael W. Flynn
May 26, 2007

Hello, and welcome to a special joint episode of Mr. Manners’ Quick and Dirty Tips for a More Polite Life and Legal Lad’s Quick and Dirty Tips for a More Lawful Life.

But first, a disclaimer: Although I am an attorney, the legal information in this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for seeking personalized legal advice from an attorney licensed to practice in your jurisdiction. Further, I do not intend to create an attorney-client relationship with any listener.

Today’s topic is neighbor relations.

MM:

Let’s go though a few basic points on good neighbor relations.

When we think of the people we live with, we may consider family members, roommates, friends, and even pets. But in reality, we often share walls or immediate space with our neighbors—in a sense, we live with them too. Therefore, it is especially important to treat your neighbors with consideration and respect. If you have ever had especially good (or especially bad) neighbors, you will know what a strong effect that can have on your daily life. I count myself lucky to have incredibly nice neighbors (I get calls to come to the backyard to pick up special treats, invitations to birthdays and parties, peace of mind knowing that when I travel there are watchful eyes on my place. And I occasionally get beaten at Scrabble).

My neighbors are better than I am at hosting neighborhood parties, keeping abreast of the goings on in the neighborhood, and making it feel like we live in a small town, in the midst of a city. So try and make the extra effort to get to know your neighbors—it will make the place where you live a richer environment.

  • Try to be considerate of your neighbors:
  • Don’t play loud music or make excessive noise late at night (or at times when you know they are home and might be disturbed).
  • If you or your guests smoke, make sure that the smoke doesn’t waft into your neighbor’s home.
  • Offer to pick up their papers and keep an eye on their place when they travel.
  • Contact them if you see anything awry or suspicious near their house.
  • If you have outdoor space, make sure that plants or animals don’t cause a nuisance for them.
  • Consult them on decisions that might affect their quality of life.
  • Be prepared to make compromises for the sake of good neighbor relations.

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