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It's Getting Better All the Time

Use your free time to work smarter, really work smarter, so you're on top of your game.

By
Stever Robbins
4-minute read
Episode #26

But you asked how to make an impact with your spare time. *Sigh* The best way to make an impact with free time is to spend it improving what you do*. Consultants call this "process improvement," because they can charge more, but it's really just doing things better; it's learning. You've heard the phrase "work smart, not hard?" This is where you work smart.

Sit down and make a list of all the things you do in a typical day. For example, you go to meetings, answer e-mail, run errands, take classes, spend time with people you love, study, read People Magazine, and eat Animal Crackers. I bite the heads off and eat those first. Your list can include stuff from all areas of your life, not just work.

Scan the list. If you could improve one thing from the list and make it quicker, stronger, faster, or easier, which would most improve your life? Would it be making meetings more effective? Spending more quality time with your family? Making better financial decisions? Reading more? Choose anything, even something you already do really well. Then brainstorm ways to do it better.

I eat animal crackers really well; I bite the heads off, then savor the body bite by bite. But then I get a sugar rush that puts me to sleep and makes me fat, but I just won't give up those tasty taste treats. So I'll brainstorm better ways to eat animal crackers. Maybe I'll bite the heads off last, instead of first. Or buy smaller boxes. Or spread out one box over several hours, to even out my blood sugar. Or, I could invent crackers shaped like politicians.

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About the Author

Stever Robbins

Stever Robbins was the host of the podcast Get-it-Done Guy from 2007 to 2019. He is a graduate of W. Edward Deming’s Total Quality Management training program and a Certified Master Trainer Elite of NLP. He holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a BS in Computer Sciences from MIT.